Concordia University Digital media & ecommerce Food

MARK 305 Consumer Behavior (Fall 2019 edition)

Here are some starting points for succeeding the final project at JMSB’s (Concordia University) MARK 305 Consumer Behavior course. Remember to think about who produces what kind of information and in which format:

1. Consumer behavior trend analysis: Where do we find information about emerging trends in CB?

2. Industry/company analysis: size, key players, strategies

  • For this part, your librarian (me!) recommends the following databases listed on the Library’s Business Research Portal
    • Passport from Euromomnitor: this time, use the “industry reports” section to learn more about your industries
    • IBISWORLD reports: this system is in the “industry analysis” section of the Business Research Portal
    • ProQuest Business Databases: find articles by searching for the name of the trade associations, major players, industry name or consumer trend concept. Focus on articles from trade journals and academic/peer-reviewed/scholarly journals
  • Do you really think Google can help you with this one?

3. Consumer analysis: demographics, size of the target market and their consumption process (pre-during-post)

REMEMBER: Cite your sources! Use the citing business databases in APA format

Community Arcade Gamification zombies

On board games

Here is a selection of books and other resources about board games. It came after a flurry of emails on academic listserv. Thank you to all of those who have suggested materials for this short bibliography !

Material on the Internet (aka “free stuff”)

Print or published material (aka “stuff you purchase or borrow from a library”)

AuthorTitlePlace of PublicationCountry of OriginPublisherCopyright Year
Tobin, JosephPikachu’s Global Adventure: The Rise and Fall of PokémonDurham :United StatesDuke University Press2004
Parlett, DavidParlett’s History of Board Games: By the Author of the Oxford History of Board GamesBrattleboroUnited StatesEcho Point Books and Media2018
Bell, R. C.Board and Table Games from Many CivilizationsNew York :United StatesDover Publications1980
Finkel, I. L.Ancient Board Games in Perspective: Papers from the 1990 British Museum ColloquiumLondonUnited KingdomBritish Museum Press2007
Peterson, JonPlaying at the World: A History of Simulating Wars, People and Fantastic Adventures, from Chess to Role-Playing GamesSan Diego, USAUnited StatesUnreason Press2012
Arnaudo, MarcoStorytelling in the Modern Board Game : Narrative Trends from the Late 1960s to Today : Narrative Trends from the Late 1960s to TodayJefferson, UNITED STATESUnited StatesMcFarland & Company, Inc.2018
Murray, Harold James RuthrenA History of Board-Games Other Than ChessOxfordUnited KingdomOxbow Books2002
Engelstein, GeoffreyBuilding Blocks of Tabletop Game Design : An Encyclopedia of MechanismsBoca Raton, FL :United StatesTaylor & Francis2019
Parlett, DavidOxford Guide to Card GamesNew York, USAUnited StatesOxford University Press1990
Livingstone, IanBoard Games in 100 MovesLondonUnited KingdomDK Publishing2019
Woods, StewartEurogames: The Design, Culture and Play of Modern European Board GamesJefferson, USAUnited StatesMcFarland & Company, Inc.2012
Booth, PaulGame Play: Paratextuality in Contemporary Board GamesNew York, USAUnited StatesBloomsbury Academic2015
Knizia, ReinerNew Tactical Games with Dice and CardsBlue Terrier Press2019
Business plans Industries and Markets

Research lecture for the eMBA program at Concordia University

When researching or launching a new business, information about industries, markets or competitors can be invaluable. In this session, we will cover resources from the Internet as well as licensed market and industry intelligence databases available from Concordia University Library. This is a workshop adapted from the “Entrepreneurship”  course at the John Molson School of Business.  

Direct link to the Business Research Portal (BRP) at Concordia University Libraries: https://www.concordia.ca/library/guides/business.html

Learning objectives

  • Locate industry and market reports from the Internet and the Library
  • Understand how to use datasets from Statistics Canada (Census & Cansim) and other national agencies
  • Develop a healthy information diet

Course Outline

1. Know your market & industry: reports from IBIS Wrold; SME Benchmarking; Mergent Intellect
2. Using Google for business research: trade associations & governments
3. Statistics Canada for entrepreneurs: Census & CANSIM
4. Reading up on your idea & staying up to date with articles

Course content

0. Where does information come from?
1. Know your industry – look up industry codes (NAICS)
2. Using Google for business research (governments & trade associations)
  • Find trade associations with Google
    • They post a lot of industry/market information on their websites
    • Trade shows, reports, analysis, press releases, lawsuits, white papers, directories, interviews, newsletters… is there a bias?
    • Watch the video for this step
  • Find government information with Google’s advanced search
    • Most government websites follow a standardized format for their addresses
    • Governments study and regulate many topics relevant for new business
    • Example: 2017 Communications Monitoring Report from the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission
Government LevelExample of “Site/domain”Tip
Municipal.ville.montreal.qc.caLook for “Montréal en statistiques” page for information for boroughs
Provincial.gouv.qc.caThe province deals with mainly: health, education, welfare, culture, agriculture/food…
“Federal”.gc.ca   .gov europa.eu Always check for reports from Industry Canada at site:.ic.gc.ca
Internationalun.org   or other agency Agencies affiliated with the United Nations have their own website
3. Statistics Canada for entrepreneurs
4. Reading up on your idea & staying up to date with articles

Concordia University Library’s Business Research Portal: http://www.concordia.ca/library/guides/business.html

Olivier Charbonneau

Olivier Charbonneau is an associate Librarian at Concordia University, Olivier Charbonneau is primarily interested in copyright issues as well as questions of open access and Web 2.0. He is a doctoral student at the Faculté de droit, Université de Montréal. He has over 15 years of professional involvement in library and cultural communities. He holds two masters degrees from Université de Montréal, one in information sciences and another in law, as well as an undergraduate degree in commerce from McGill University.

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